Thursday, December 13, 2007

Dawn of a New Day (1939)

The 1939 New York World's Fair song "Dawn of a New Day" was written by George and Ira Gershwin. Unfortunately, I don't remember where I found the song so I can't give credit where credit is due. You can listen to the song here.

See also:
Railroads on Parade (1939)
All's Fair at the Fair (1938)
Memory of 'Tomorrow' (New York Times, 1941)
Donald Duck's "Modern Inventions" (1937)
Metal Man Comes to Life (1939)

5 comments:

Dave said...

"Dawn of a New Day" may be heard in a period performance on a Sony CD (From Gershwin's Time). The suitably futuristic orchestration features a prominent part for theremin.

Anonymous said...

Test comment.

Alec Rawls said...

That audio hosting site is pretty cool. I'll have to try using it myself.

Alan said...

Another retro-future song I always liked is "I.G.Y." by Donald Fagen of Steely Dan - here are the lyrics:

Standing tough under stars and stripes
We can tell
This dream's in sight
You've got to admit it
At this point in time that it's clear
The future looks bright

On that train all graphite and glitter
Undersea by rail
Ninety minutes from New York to Paris
Well by seventy-six we'll be A.O.K.

What a beautiful world this will be
What a glorious time to be free

Get your ticket to that wheel in space
While there's time
The fix is in
You'll be a witness to that game of chance in the sky
You know we've got to win
Here at home we'll play in the city
Powered by the sun
Perfect weather for a streamlined world
There'll be spandex jackets one for everyone

What a beautiful world this will be
What a glorious time to be free

On that train all graphite and glitter
Undersea by rail
Ninety minutes from New York to Paris
(More leisure for artists everywhere)
A just machine to make big decisions
Programmed by fellows with compassion and vision
We'll be clean when their work is done
We'll be eternally free yes and eternally young

What a beautiful world this will be
What a glorious time to be free.

jayessell said...

Check out the Television song from 1936:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Rpfek-F8Rw

It's from "Televison Comes to London"

In correct order the entire film is:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87VOe80cgbQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xIA7Z7zBuc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Rpfek-F8Rw